• ** Click to view value source
  1. Black Market: Counterfeit Foods $49 Billion

News and information about the trade in counterfeit foods and mislabeled foods. Impact on public health and financial health of companies and industries. Data collected from various public health programs, security services and news reports.

In Febraury 2014, Interpol and Europol reported on global raids conducted against producers and sellers of counterfeit foods.

In total, over 1,200 tonnes of counterfeit and substandard food and nearly 430,000 liters of counterfeit beverages were seized across 33 countries. 96 people were arrested by various criminal justice programs during the investigation.

Highlights of the campaign against counterfeit foods:

  • Across Europe, over 131,000 liters of fake oil and vinegar , 80,000 counterfeit biscuits and chocolate bars, 20 tonnes of fake spices and condiments, and 45 tonnes of substandard dairy products were seized by Europol.
  • In Italy, 60,000 bottles and labels of fake champagne was seized.
  • Police in Thailand found over 270 bottles of fake whiskey.
  • $17.2 Million worth of counterfeit foods and drinks were seized in Colombia.

Source:  “Global police swoop seizes millions in fake food, drink,” Channel NewsAsia, February 14, 2014.

Criminal justice programs in Russia reported that sales of counterfeit whiskey in the country may have been worth $230 Million (8 Billion Rubles) in 2013.

Based on sales and import tracking data, the State Statistics Service in Russia reported that retailers sold 9.9 million more liters of whiskey than officially imported. Officials believe that this figure represents the number of counterfeit whiskey bottles sold in the country.

In 2012, an estimated 7.8 million liters of fake whiskey was sold in Russia.

Media in Russia reported that whiskey is the most popular alcohol to be counterfeited in the country, followed by rum and tequila.

Source:  RIA Novosti, “Russians Drank 10M Liters of Counterfeit Whiskey in 2013,” Moscow Times, February 10, 2014.

In the English city of Sheffield, security officers and public health programs are seeing an increase in illegal bottles of counterfeit alcohol.

In the 2011 to 2012 fiscal year, officials in the city seized 554 bottles of counterfeit alcohol. In the 2012-2013 fiscal year, the number of fake bottles seized increased to 1,470. Halfway through the 2013-2014 fiscal year, authorities have already seized 2,370 bottles of counterfeit alcohol.

Most of the fake alcohol bottles are marketed as Vodka. After studying the bottles, Trading Standards officials have determined that most of the alcohol that is used in the fake bottles are either cleaning fluids or antifreeze. With the other chemicals, the fake bottles of vodka end up being made of 57 percent alcohol.

Sheffield is not the only city in the United Kingdom facing threats from counterfeit alcohol. In Scotland, security services with HMRC seized 13,000 liters of counterfeit vodka in September 2013 alone.

Security experts state that price is a main cause for the counterfeits. For a single 70cl bottle of vodka, the duty and VAT is $14.52 (£8.89).

Source:  Brian Milligan, “Fake vodka ‘can kill you’ warning to Christmas shoppers,” BBC News, December 20, 2013.

Buy VPN

In 2012, government security services in Italy seized 28,000 tons of counterfeit food labels or adulterated products that was falsely labeled during the year. The counterfeit foods seized were worth $684 Million (€500 Million).

47 percent of the counterfeit labels involved Italian wine products.

4.6 tons of fake foods involved canned tomatoes, which were falsely labeled as organic or being produced in Italy.

Source:  “Food pirates peddling fake olive oil, Chinese tomato sauce,” Ansa, December 5, 2013.

It was previously reported that up to 42,000 people were dying in Russia each year due to consuming counterfeit alcohol and other illegally made alcohol.

After increase monitoring and enforcement by Russian security services, the number of deaths dropped to around 12,000 in 2010.

In an example of the smuggling, one man stopped in 2013 had 800 bottles of counterfeit vodka and 220 bottles of counterfeit cognac in his truck.

Source:  “Russian Tells Cops Huge Moonshine Trove For Personal Use,” RIA Novosti, November 7, 2013.

Wine industry experts estimate that up to 20 percent of all wine bottles sold worldwide are counterfeits. Previously, it was reported back in 2010 that 5 percent of wine bottles sold were fake.

In court documents rleased in the United Kingdom, it was reported that wine connoissuers in Britain paid up to $11,148 (£7,000) for fake bottles of vintage French wine.

Source:  Henry Samuel, “Fifth of wine sold worldwide is ‘fake’,” Telegraph, November 1, 2013.

In the first 7 months of 2013, police in China conducted over 19,000 anti-counterfeiting cases throughout the country. The Ministry of Public Security reported that the counterfeit products seized and destroyed by the Chinese security service included:

Source:  “China police crack down on counterfeit goods,” Channel News Asia, August 10, 2013.

Between January and July 2013, authorities in Ireland seized 840 liters of counterfeit alcohol across the country.

Officials state that most of the organized crime groups involved in the production of counterfeit alcohol also are invovled in cigarette smuggling.

Source:  “‘Unscrupulous pub owners’ selling dangerous counterfeit alcohol,” Journal, August 6, 2013.

In the first six months of 2013, authorities in Yemen seized and destroyed over 57 tons of counterfeit and expired foods, counterfeit cosmetics and counterfeit drugs. 581 cases of counterfeiting have been identified by law enforcement, with 522 cases being sent to the Prosecutors office.

Amongst the actions taken by officials were seizing  50,000 packs of chewing gum and shutting down 8 ice cream factories that were shut down due to lack safety standards and substandard ingredients.

In 2012, over 80 tons of counterfeit goods was seized and destroyed in Yemen.

Source: Ali Ibrahim Al-Moshki, “Over 57 tons of expired, counterfeit goods destroyed,” Yemen Times, July 8, 2013.

European Union police agency Europol reported that 28.6 percent of all counterfeit goods seized in 2011 consisted of counterfeit foods and counterfeit drugs. The portion of fake foods and medicines seized in 2011 was up from 14.5 percent in 2010.

Source:  Financial Times, “Crime Gangs Look to Clean Up as Europe’s Black Market Balloons,” CNBC, June 24, 2013.

123