Kidnap and Ransom

News, information and statistics about kidnap for ransom activities. Data about the security threat is collected from intelligence reports, security companies, kidnap for ransom insurance brokers, hostage negotiators and other public information.

There were 41 cases of kidnapping for ransom in the Philippines in 2010, according to the National Police.

The 2010 total was less then the 57 cases of kidnapping for ransom that occurred in the country in 2009.

(See all kidnapping cases here.)

Source: Abigail Kwok, “Kidnap cases drop in ’10–PNP ,” Inquirer, January 12, 2011.

In 2010, 18 of the 58 total pirate attacks of the shores of Nigeria involved kidnapping and ransom demands for hostages. In 2008 and 2009, only 8 kidnapping piracy cases involved ransom demands.

Source: AFP, “Cash-driven piracy to rise in Nigeria’s oil delta: analysts,” Google News, January 3, 2011.

Between 2001 and 2010, there has been roughly 20,000 kidnapping incidents that demanded ransom payments worldwide, according to the Safe Travel Institute.

Source: James Mayer, “Plot to abduct business executives, such as Columbia Sportswear’s Gert Boyle, boom overseas but are rare in U.S.,” Oregonian, November 19, 2010.

The FBI has reported that up to 90 percent of kidnapping for ransom attempts in the United States are stopped by law enforcement.

Source: James Mayer, “Plot to abduct business executives, such as Columbia Sportswear’s Gert Boyle, boom overseas but are rare in U.S.,” Oregonian, November 19, 2010.

In 2009, there were 300 reported cases of kidnapping for ransom in Pakistan.

In the first 9 months of 2010, there were 550 reported cases of kidnapping for ransom in the country.

Source: Azizullah Khan, “Massive rise in kidnappings in Pakistani province,” BBC News, October 14, 2010.

Kidnapping for ransom by human smugglers on the US-Mexico border captures around 20,000 migrants each year. The kidnapped victims are forced to give a phone number of a relative and must pay upwards of $3,000 to be released.

Source: “No safe passage,” Economist, September 9, 2010.

Between September 2008 and February 2009, an estimated 10,000 migrants who were attempting to cross the border into the United States were kidnapped and held for ransom by human smugglers.

Source: Sara Miller Llana, “Mexico mass grave highlights abuse of migrants heading to US,” Christian Science Monitor, August 26, 2010.

In 2009, there were 138 cases of kidnapping for ransom cases reported in the Philippines.

In 2008, there were 135 cases reported.

The ransom payments demanded fell between the range of $11,000 to $44,000 (500,000 to 2 Million Philippine Peso).

Source: Alexis Romero, “Kidnapping cases up in 2009 – risk consultancy,” Philippine Star, August 20, 2010.

A $1 Million kidnap-for-ransom payment in sea piracy can earn a single pirate between $6,000 to $10,000.

Source: UNODC, “The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 9: Maritime Piracy, June 2010.

The average kidnapping for ransom payment that resulted from maritime piracy was between $500,000 to $2 Million in 2008. In 2009, reports placed the average ransom payment higher.

Source: UNODC, “The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 9: Maritime Piracy, June 2010.