Cocaine

News, information and statistics about cocaine abuse and the trafficking of cocaine. Data about cocaine is collected from criminal justice public health programs, drug treatment centers, security agencies and other public information sources.

Cocaine trafficked in the United States was worth $35 Billion in 2008.

Based on 2008 dollar values adjusted for inflation, the financial value of cocaine in the United States has fallen over 20 years.

1988: $134 Billion

1998: $44 Billion

2008: $35 Billion.

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Source: UNODC, ‘The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 4: Cocaine, June 2010.

German security personnel arrested 4,325 people for selling cocaine in 2008, and 605 people for trafficking cocaine into the country.

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 Source: UNODC, “The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 4: Cocaine, June 2010.

45 percent of all cocaine seizures that took place in Europe between 1998 and 2008 took place in Spain, according to security officials.

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  Source: UNODC, “The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 4: Cocaine, June 2010.

In 1998, the financial value of the European cocaine market was $14 Billion.

By 2008, the value of the cocaine market in Europe was $34 Billion.

In terms of consumption, 63 tons of cocaine was used by drug users in Europe in 1998. Ten years later, 124 tons of cocaine was used by drug users.

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Source: UNODC, “The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 4: Cocaine, June 2010.

According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, cocaine seizures were reported by 44 countries in 1980.

By 2007/2008, trafficking of cocaine became a global operation as 130 countries were reporting cocaine seizures within their borders.

In 2008, the global supply of cocaine was 865 metric tons, down from 1,024 metric tons in 2007.

Source: UNODC, “The Globalization of Crime,” Chapter 4: Cocaine, June 2010.

In the ten years between 1998 to 2008, the area devoted to coca cultivation in Peru increased by 45 percent. In 2008 alone, the area of coca cultivation increased by 4.5 percent in Peru from the previous year.

In contrast, in 2008 coca cultivation in Colombia decreased by 18 percent from the previous year.

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Source: Simon Romero, “Coca Growing Surges in Peru as Drug Fight Shifts Trade,” New York Times, June 13, 2010.

Every day an estimated 30 tons of cocaine is being transported within the Caribbean region, according to intelligence officers.

Over the course of a year, up to 1,400 tons of cocaine is shipped across the Atlantic Ocean to Europe, with only 43 tons, or 3 percent, of the cocaine seized by security officials.

Source: Thomas Harding, “Royal Navy launches anti-sub war against drug cartels,” Telegraph, May 29, 2010.

Based upon intelligence and estimates by criminal justice programs in the United States, the following is the amount of illegal drugs sold to customers in the US each year.

According to the Office of National Drug Control Policy, almost all of these drugs are smuggled into the country.

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Source: Associated Press, “U.S. drug war has met none of its goals,” MSNBC, May 13, 2010.

390 metric tons of cocaine was produced in Colombia in 2009, down from 430 in 2008.

68,025 hectares of land was devoted to growing coca in the country, the lowest level since 1998.

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Source: Matthew Bristol, “Colombian Cocaine Production Fell to 11-Year Low Last Year,” Bloomberg BusinessWeek, May 12, 2010.

In 2002, 2,955 kilos of cocaine was seized in Costa Rica by security forces.

In 2007, more than 32,000 kilos of cocaine was seized in Costa Rica.

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Source:  Pete Thomas, “Is Costa Rica becoming a new major theater for drug traffickers?,” Outposts, Los Angeles Times, April 21, 2009.