Illegal Logging

News, information and statistics about illegal logging and the destruction of forests. Data about the illegal timber trade is collected from various wildlife charities, environmental protection agencies and other criminal justice information.

Illegal logging lead to more than 90 percent of the 270,000 cubic meters of logs and the 170,00 cubic meters of sawn timber imported into China from Myanmar to be illegal.

Source:  Global Witness, “Dramatic decrease in illegal timber trade between Burma and China but smuggling continues; China urged to do more,” Press Release, October 21, 2009.

Illegal logging from China accounts for ten percent of the global trade in timber.

Source:  Global Witness, “Dramatic decrease in illegal timber trade between Burma and China but smuggling continues; China urged to do more,” Press Release, October 21, 2009.

Illegal logging in Pakistan creates annual losses of $782 Million (65 Billion Pakistani Rupees).

Source:  Animesh Roul, “Gems, Timber and Jiziya: Pakistan’s Taliban Harness Resources to Fund Jihad,” Jamestown Foundation, April 30, 2009.

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Illegal logging in Peru lead to an estimated $44.5 Million in losses in 2005.

Source: “Peru losses $44.5 million to illegal logging,” illegal-logging.info, February 1, 2006.

Illegal logging in Cambodia creates a black market worth $13 Million a year.

Source:  “Cambodia,” illegal-logging.info, accessed: October 10, 2009.

Illegal logging in Vietnam has cut down the numbers of rare Red Pine trees in the country from over 300 in 2004 to less than 100 trees in 2009.

The trees are illegally logged due to their medicinal benefits.

Source:  H. Huong, “Illegal logging drives rare pine to edge of extinction,” SGGP, October 8, 2009.

Illegal logging by gangs in Madagascar lead to about 7,000 cubic meters of timber a month to be cut down in 2009.

The wood would then be sold in Asia at prices of $5,000 a cubic meter.

Source:  Richard Lough, “Madagascar accused of profiting from illegal timber,” Reuters, October 3, 2009.

Illegal logging leads to 20 to 40 percent of all wood production globally, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

Source:  Matilda Lee, “Can we trust the FSC?”, Ecologist, September 22, 2009.

Illegal logging has lead to global prices of wood to be depressed by as much as 16 percent.

Source:  Raffi Khatchadourian, “The Stolen Forests,” New Yorker, October 6, 2008.

Illegal logging in Russia leads to the highest amount of unauthorized wood when timber is sent to China for manufacturing.

Source:  Raffi Kheatadourian, “The Stolen Forests,” New Yorker, October 6, 2008.