Income from Migrant Kidnapping in Mexico

According to the National Commission on Human Rights in Mexico, kidnappers who hold migrants for ransom in the country earn up to $25 Million in a 6 month time period based upon the average ransom paid. The Commission estimates that up to 10,000 migrants are kidnapped and held for ransom in a 6 month period, with the ransom demand being between $1,500 to $5,000 on average.

Continue Reading →

Cost to Hire Security Guards to Stop Pirates

The Security Association of the Maritime Industry (Sami) reported to the BBC that there were over 200 companies providing security services in the north-west region of the Indian Ocean. 139 companies are members of the association, with almost half of the members being companies based in the United Kingdom. The companies provide a range of services, from ransom negotiation to armed guards to prevent kidnappings. An armed guard working in a group of three can make up to $634 (500 British Pounds) in a 5-day tour.

Continue Reading →

Kidnappings by the Taliban in Karachi, Pakistan

Police in the Pakistani city of Karachi report the Taliban is generating revenue from kidnap and ransom activities, extortion and bank robberies. In 2011, there were over 100 cases of kidnap for ransom cases in the city, an all time high.Local criminals who kidnap for ransom generally hold their hostage for up to six weeks until some sort of payment or settlement is made. Hostages held by the Taliban are generally held between 6 months to 1 year and demand payment in foreign currency.

Continue Reading →

Kidnapping in Lahore

Between January 1 to March 20, 2012, there have been as many as 400 reported cases of kidnapping across the Pakistani city of Lahore. In 2011, there were around 2,954 cases of kidnappings reported in the city. In 2010, up to 2,831 people were kidnapped. According to city residents, the most effective way to retrieve kidnapped family members is to pay the ransom.

Continue Reading →

Kidnapping in Mexico Between 2005 to 2012

Between 2005 and 2012, the number of kidnappings for ransom cases in Mexico increased by over 300 percent. Over one-fifth of the kidnapping cases in Mexico involves police or military soldiers, according to a congressional report published in the country in 2011. In 14 states in Mexico, less than one percent of crimes committing in 2010 had a chance of going to trail and ending with a sentencing.

Continue Reading →