1. Transnational Crime Intelligence
  1. Arms Trafficking$1 Billion
  2. Human Smuggling$35 Billion
  3. Human Trafficking$32 Billion
  4. International Adoptions$1.3 Billion
  5. Nuclear Smuggling$100 Million
  6. Organ Trafficking$75 Million
  7. Organized Crime$322 Billion
  8. Prostitution$186.00 Billion

Information and statistics about transnational crime. Data about security threats and vulnerabilities from transnational organized crime groups are collected from intelligence agencies, criminal justice programs and other public information sources.

According to a study by the Small Arms Survey, there are an estimated 10 million firearms and guns circulating in the hands of civilians in Thailand.

The price of buy a gun in Thailand costs about $2,600 on the black market, according to previous reports.

(More prices of AK-47s and other guns on the black market.)

Source:  Charlie Campbell, “If There’s Going to Be a Thai Civil War, Isaan Will Be Its Front Line,” Time, July 2, 2014.

The agency responsible for anti-money laundering campaigns in Singapore reported an increase in cases during 2013.

According to the Commercial Affairs Department, the agency received 22,417 suspicious transaction reports during the 2013 year, and increase of 25 percent from the previous year. In 341 instances, the agency provided intelligence to foreign agencies, up from the 160 cases of intelligence sharing that took place in 2012.

In total, security officials in Singapore seized over $92 Million (115 Million Singaporean Dollars) in suspected criminal proceeds.

According to a spokesman for the agency, more transnational organized crime groups are using the country’s financial industry in order to move their illicit funds.

(All money laundering statistics here.)

Source:  Andrea Tan, “Singapore Says More Overseas Criminals Seek Bank Accounts,” Bloomberg Businessweek, July 2, 2014.

Security forces in Cambodia arrested two Cambodia men for organizing a kidney selling ring in Thailand. The men ran an organ trafficking ring that sent 5 people to hospitals in Thailand with fake documents in order to have their kidneys removed.

According to police officials, the men sold the kidney’s for $10,000 (325,000 Thai Baht). To the human sellers who sold their kidneys, the men paid them between $3,000 to $5,000.

(See how much kidneys sell for on the black market.)

Source:  “Cambodian kidney traffickers arrested,” Bangkok Post, July 2, 2014.

A man in Monaco paid a pair of hitmen over $330,000 (€250,000) in cash and gifts to kill his mother-in-law.

Wojciech Janowski previously serviced as Poland’s honorary counsel in Monaco and was married to the daughter of a heiress. In an attempt to gain access to the wealth of the mother-in-law, Janowski paid $272,000 (€200,000) in cash and an additional $67,000 (€50,000) in gifts.

Security officials do not believe that the wife of Janowski and the daughter of the victim had anything to do with the contract killing.

(See more reported prices of hitmen around the world.)

Source:  AFP, “Son-in-law charged with contract killing of Monaco heiress,” Channel NewsAsia, June 28, 2014.

Government officials in the Netherlands reported that the legalized trade of drugs and prostitution in Amsterdam and across the country contributes $3.4 Billion (€2.5 Billion) to the national economy. The two industries contribute to 0.4 percent of the Netherlands GDP.

Statistics Netherlands stated that most of the consumption of the services is domestic and takes place in the marijuana coffee shops and brothels.

(Sex trade revenue around the world.)

Source:  “It’s official: drugs, prostitution boost Dutch economy,” Reuters, June 25, 2014.

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A man from Myanmar told a reporter from the Associated Press that he was sold by a human trafficking broker to a Thailand fishing boat for $616. The man originally thought that he was going to work on the boat for 6 months, yet ended up working for over a year. During the time, the Burmese man stated that he slept for 3 hours a night.

The seafood industry in Thailand employees 2 million people and is constantly facing a labor shortage. Many Thais do not want to work on the fishing boats where the wages are low, the job is dangerous, and many boats are at sea for months and even years. To meet this shortage, an estimated 200,000 migrants from Cambodia and Myanmar are working on the boats. A 2013 survey of 600 workers conducted by the United Nations found that almost none had signed a labor contract and about 40 percent had their wages cut without explanation.

Nearly 6 out of 10 migrant workers on Thai fishing  boats reported seeing a co-worker killed by the captain, according to a 2009 UN report. The man who was sold by traffickers told the AP that after a sick man died on the boat the captain simply tossed the body overboard.

The fishing industry in Thailand exported nearly $7 Billion worth of seafood in 2013. Most of the seafood was exported to Japan and the United States.

Source:  Associated Press,  “Thailand’s Rampant Trafficking May Carry Price,” ABC News, June 13, 2014.

A report by the Center for Strategic and International Studies and computer security company McAfee reported that up to$445 Billion a year is being lost globally to cybercrime activities.

Online crime, hacking and the theft of intellectual property could cause up to 200,000 jobs being lost in the United States and up to 150,000 jobs in Europe.

A reported 50 million people in the United States had their personal identification stolen within the past year.

Source:  Chris Strohm, “Cybercrime Remains Growth Industry With $445 Billion Lost,” Bloomberg, June 9, 2014

A BBC report stated that many women in their 50s, 60s and 70s in South Korea are offering sexual services to elderly men in order to survive. The women gather in Jongmyo Park in Seoul where they offer Bacchus energy drinks for sale. Retired men who gather in the park purchase the energy drink and then bring the woman to a nearby motel.

According to one customer interviewed by the BBC, the price for sex with the women costs between $19 to $29 (20,000 to 30,000 South Korean Won.)

About 400 women work as prostitutes in the park. A social worker who interviewed the women stated that one women started working as a prostitute at age 68. Most of the women are experiencing financial difficulties.

(Additional prostitute rates from around the world.)

Source:  Lucy Williamson, “The Korean grandmothers who sell sex,” BBC News, June 9, 2014.

Police in Vietnam broke up a human trafficking ring where women were being sold as brides to men in China. According to media reports, the men were paying $11,800 (250 Million Vietnamese Dong) for the women in 2014.

In June of 2013, Chinese men were caught paying $5,700 (120 Million Vietnamese Dong) for Vietnamese women to be their wives in China.

(More prices of human trafficking victims worldwide.)

Security experts in both countries state that the gender imbalance in China is leading to more women from neighboring countries to be trafficked. In 2013, there were 697.2 million males and 663.4 million females in China. With 33.8 million more men in the country, many men in rural areas are finding it difficult to find available women, leading to the black market in brides.

(See all human trafficking statistics here.)

Source:  Ngoc Ha, “6 arrested for trafficking Vietnam women to China,” Thanh Nien, June 6, 2014.

A human trafficker who was arrested by security forces in Italy explained the cost structure a that migrants departing from North Africa to Europe must pay in order to be smuggled on a boat.

The boats that consist of the human smuggling market of North Africa to Italy are usually retired fishing boats that are in bad conditions. The migrants first must pay between $1,000 to $2,500 to reserve a spot on the boat. That fee is simply to have a spot on the boat. The migrant must them pay for all charges and expenses while on the boat. According to the trafficker, a life jacket costs $200. Bottles of water and cans of tuna costs up to $100. The “first class” section of the boat, which is located on the top deck and not being crowded into the ship’s hull costs $200 to $300. Blankets and rain coats costs $200. Pregnant women must pay $150 for catheters because many consider the urine of pregnant women to be poisonous. Use of the satellite phone for a few minuets costs $300. And children who are making the journey without parents are charged $1,500.

Between January and June 2014, security forces in Italy estimate that over 43,000 people have reached the Italian shores, an increase of 835 percent from the same period in 2013. In a single weekend at the end of May, a total of 3,162 migrants from Syria and North Africa were seized on 11 fishing boats off the coast of Sicily.

Source:  Barbie Latza Nadeau, “Confessions of a Human Trafficker Who Smuggled Desperate Migrants Into Europe,” Daily Beast, June 5, 2014.